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The 2016 Patsy Ratings: No. 6 - Georgetown

"What are you doing?" a Committee member said.

Another Committee member was crying in front of the TV.

"Take out that tape and get yourself together," she said, directing the member to eject the final Syracuse/Georgetown Big East semifinal game played in 2014.

"I'm sorry," he said, "Requiem for the Big East does it to me every time.  Dave Gavitt.  John Thompson."

"You know you have a job to do, right?", the irritated Committee member reminded him.  "There's that, oh, I don't know, matter of the current state of Georgetown's Patsy Point recruiting class?  A real, live team in a real, live conference?  That exists in the present?"

The Committee member blew his nose.  "Oh, that's already done.  Check the file next to the fax machine.  It's ready.

He pops the tape into the machine again, and presses play.  The tears well up once again.


THE GOOD:  Oddly, what might be the best part of Georgetown's class is the fact that it looks a lot like everyone else's.  Ever since the Patriot League allowed its members to offer conventional athletic scholarships for football players, the Hoya Saxas were the only holdout, electing to still needs-test their aid.

The fear was that scholarships would cause Georgetown to fall back irretrievably from the other six.  That emphatically has not been the case, according to the Patsies, which strangely is reflected in the Hoyas' "Class Size."  In years past, it was required to pull in very large numbers simply to make a non-scholarship, needs-tested roster. In 2016, Georgetown is in the same boat as everyone else: filling out limited numbers of roster spots.  Conventional scholarships or needs-tested aid, it's hard to get on Georgetown's football team.  That bodes well for the caliber of recruit Georgetown is continuing to get.

Pretty Sure This Is Why the Fax was Blurry
THE BAD:  Having praised Georgetown for a smaller class, there still the case of "quality points."  The main downside to this particular incoming class is the overall lack of "quality points" it generated in the Patsy Ratings.

Like every football program, they want and need to get starred recruits from the national ranking services - represented in the Patsy system as "quality points".  The Committee was going over the list of recruits, and didn't see any starred players at all for the longest time - until, at the last minute, a Committee Member ran into the room with a blurry fax of a three-star recruit for Scout.  This recruit would pay huge dividends for the class, but the truth remains that one starred recruit provided the lions share of the Hoyas' "quality points".  Overall, that's not good.

PATSY POINT CALCULATION
CLASS SIZE: 2.  The size of Georgetown's class is 18 recruits, just barely making the cutoff to receive Patsy Points.

QUALITY: 12.  As mentioned, only 6 of Georgetown's recruits were recognized by the services, or just about 1/3 of the class.  Also, as mentioned, most of those points came from a singular Scout rating of three stars of one of their players - more than half.

At one point, The Committee was looking far and wide for information on Georgetown's class, and called up Scout's page on Georgetown.  On the page was listed a two-star QB, but he didn't appear in the official Georgetown recruit list.  Curious, the Committee looked further - and saw that the two-star recruit had committed to Division II Georgetown College.  Scout mistakenly listed them as a Georgetown University commit.

"If Georgetown College gets better starred recruits than Georgetown," it was overheard, "we're all in trouble."

DISTRIBUTION: 8.   Every position was covered in this category except for TE.

"Quarterbacks - The Patsy Helpers"
TRIGGER: 5.  Two QBs in this class illustrate again how rated QBs and starred QBs are the gift that keeps on giving.  That one *** profile not only became more than half of the ankle-biters' quality points: he also contributed four points in this category, too.  That, along with the second QB that at least had a page in the recruiting services, illustrate why quarterbacks, around the Committee offices, are called the "Patsy Helper".

SPEED: 1.  One of those aforementioned QBs - don't ask the Committee members who, they're too tired to look it up - also provided speed points on one of his point totals.

JUMBO: 4.  1 of 2 DL made the size cutoff and 3 of 3 OL made the size cutoffs to receive "jumbo points," a pretty good turnaround.

We Are Guessing His Fax Machine Is Broken
The determination of needs for Georgetown was determined by the Committee, since the Hoya faithful, evidently working hard on the political campaign of Rick Perry or something, did not answer the call to the need areas of the Battleship Grey.  Head coach Rob Sgarlata also did not answer the Committee's repeated faxes for answers.  (Maybe the Committee should go to some other more modern means of communication, like carrier pigeon.)

A special note: The Committee has found, over time, that when The Committee takes over the areas of need, they tend to be more generous than the fans when assessing needs.

NEEDS:

1. OL: 3 (out of 5).  The G-Men lose 3 OL and a long snapper, and, in the Committee's estimation, could use improvement in this area, so they put this as their top need area.  The coaching staff got 3 recruits, none of which had a page on the recruiting services.  Ultimately, the numbers got them the 3 points.  Some Committee members thought this was a bit generous.

2. WR: 0 (out of 4).  The Hoyas had 3 seniors last year who were big contributors in the receiving game, so the Committee would have expected numbers and/or starred players to replace them.  The Committee saw neither.  They felt completely justified in giving no points here.

3. DB: 2 (out of 3).  Three senior DBs graduate for the Hoyas, most likely to begin their professional careers as congressmen or better yet, lobbyists.  The seniors included several starters and one team captain, so this also seemed like the right call in terms of need areas.  They got three DBs in their incoming class.  They seemed to meet numbers, which was good, but only one was recognized in the rankings, which wasn't.  Numbers, again, got them the 2 points.

ADJUSTMENT: +0.  It was extremely tempting for one Committee member to make a negative adjustment for the Hoya class because of the inordinate amount that QBs are represented in the overall Patsy Point calculation.

"Look at the ratio," he said.  "Almost half the overall points came from the two quarterbacks on the team!  That feels unbalanced," a code word that Committee members loosely translate as a 5 point deduction.

"But this isn't the first time a class got most of its points from QBs," another member said.  "It seems like we say this every year.  QBs are the most important position on the field, after all.  I have a problem if a team gets 5 QBs and they generate 35-40 points alone.  Not so much if they secure the services of two QBs.  It's a very good chance that at least one of them will see time on offense."

Maybe it was because they waited for some blurry faxes that never came from vacationing Committee members, but the vote in the room was very much on the side of the "no adjustment".

The Ratings (With 5 To Go):

GEORGETOWN - 37
FORDHAM - 34

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